County Tops of England: Rutland

Cold Overton Field: 197 metres (Grid Ref: SK827085)
Route Statistics and Files
Start: Cold Overton Road Grid Ref: SK829089 Distance: 0.8 miles (1.4 km)
Climbing: 9 metres Time: 30 minutes Rating: Easy
GPX Route File Google Earth File Map: 234 Rutland Water
Statistics
Start: Cold Overton Road Grid Ref: SK829089
Distance: 0.8 miles (1.4 km) Time: 30 minutes
Climbing: 9 metres Rating: Easy
GPX Route File Google Earth File
Map: 234 Rutland Water
The highest trig pillar in Rutland
The highest trig pillar in Rutland (image courtesy of Wikipedia)

The Walk: Walk from the crossroads south along the lane past the Radio Relay Station and the nearby farm to a covered reservoir and continue on the field-side path for another 300 metres. Look out for the first field boundary on the far side of the hedge to your right and you will spot a trig pillar near the hedge side. That is the high point. You may need permission to leave the permissive path and cross into the next field to claim it. Whatever you do to achieve your personal goal, return by the way you came.

The Walk I Would Do: After seeking permission to touch the trig pillar I would do this short walk then I would head to the east side of nearby Oakham to find a nice walk featuring Rutland Water such as this lovely walk by Ken Brockway.


Information: Rutland is a landlocked county in the East Midlands of England, bounded to the west and north by Leicestershire, to the northeast by Lincolnshire and the southeast by Northamptonshire. Its greatest length north to south is only 18 miles (29 km) and its greatest breadth east to west is 17 miles (27 km). It is the smallest historic county in England and the fourth smallest in the UK as a whole. Because of this, the Latin motto Multum in Parvo or "much in little" was adopted by the county council in 1950. It has the smallest population of any normal unitary authority in mainland England and only the City of London is smaller in terms of area. Among modern ceremonial counties the Isle of Wight, City of London and City of Bristol are smaller in area. The former County of London, in existence 1889 to 1965, also had a smaller area. It is 348th of the 354 districts in population. (Source: Wikipedia)


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